Family, Legacy

As the twig is bent, so grows the tree

Identifying: We Reap the Same in Kind As We Sow 

As the twig is bent

Several years ago, “Our Daily Bread” carried an article by an anonymous author on the power of example.  It would be worth repeating it here.

“One day when Junior was 14 he noticed his father wearing a happy grin as he came home from the office.

“Got pinched for speeding, but Jake down at the city hall got the ticket fixed for me,’ he said.

“When Junior was 15, he was with his mother in the family car when she backed into a tree.  The damage would easily exceed $100.

“We’ll say someone rammed into us when we were parked downtown, she said. ‘Then we’ll collect insurance for it.’

When the boy was 16, he listened to his grandfather reminiscing about the ‘good old days of rationing’ when he made $100,000 black-marketing cars.  That same night Uncle John was bragging that on a good share of his business he sent no bills and took no checks—just cash.

“Why be a sucker and let those punks in the Internal Revenue Department get all my money?’ he asked.

“When Junior turned 18, his family pulled every possible string to get him a paid scholarship at a coveted Ivy League school.  They even lied about the family income to make it seem that their son needed financial aid.  When he had a rough time scholastically, an upperclassman sold him the answers to the calculus examination.  Junior was caught and expelled.  When he returned home, his mother burst into hysterical weeping over the disgrace he had caused.

“How could you have done this to us’; she sobbed.

‘This isn’t the way we raised you.””

John Lawrence:  I have a feeling I know why this was written anonymously; it is too like the real thing not to be based upon reality.

As someone has well expressed it “As the twig is bent it is apt to snap back in your face.

(The 7 Laws of the Harvest; Page 41)

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Legacy

Unblessed

A Fading Glory

 Unblessed

Profound sadness gripped my soul as I read the disheartening account of the story in first Samuel Ch. 13.  The last verse (v22) reads…

So on the day of battle not a soldier with Saul and Jonathan had a sword or spear in hand; only Saul and his son Jonathan had a sword in hand.

Can you imagine how helpless you would feel facing your greatest battle with no defenses at all? And as the king leading a whole nation, can you picture the pressure and anxiety of not being able to protect your own people… their possessions, the children, elderly and most vulnerable? Can you imagine looking at your oldest son (the only other person with a sword in the entire nation; other than you)?  A son who is now looking up to you for military directives, knowing you are outnumbered, overpowered and don’t stand a chance to win the battle set in front of you?

For years and years, Israel had been oppressed, harassed and attacked by the Philistines and this day was no different. The Philistines had assembled to fight against Israel.  Their army consisted of 3,000 chariots, 6,000 charioteers, and soldiers as numerous as the sand on the seashore, while Israel, on the other hand, had 2 armed men and a dwindling army of 600 men whose counterparts had run off in fear to hide in caves, rocks, and thickets—some even crossing the Jordan to the land of Gad and Gilead.

Saul too was afraid.  His ONLY consolation was that Samuel was on his way.  The only problem, Samuel was late.  Samuel represented something BIGGER to Saul and the whole nation.  Samuel’s presence was as good as God’s presence in Israel.  He was the mouthpiece of God.  A prophet and a judge, a consecrated priest who God had appointed at a very young age to take the place of Eli and his (irreverent sons—Hophni and Phinehas).  If Samuel came, it was 99.9% likely God would deliver Israel with a miracle.  And oh’ how Israel needed a MIRACLE at that very moment.

Unfortunately, however, with more men dropping off the force, and Saul unable to contain his fear—he gives into the pressure and decides to do what Samuel alone was appointed to do.  He offers the sacrifice.  Desperate to seek the LORD’s favor, Saul offers the sacrifice (a sacred role reserved for God’s priests). But just as soon as Saul is finished offering the sacrifice, Samuel arrives. “What is this you have done? You have done a foolish thing” if Saul’s heart could sink any deeper—these were seriously not the words he needed at a time like this, but wait, there was more.

“You have not kept the command the Lord your God gave you; if you had, he would have established your kingdom over Israel for all time.  But now your kingdom will not endure; the Lord has sought out a man after his own heart and appointed him ruler of his people because you have not kept the Lord’s command.”

What a sorrowful day for Saul.  Could things get any worse?

Can you think of a time when things were going so well, and God’s favor seemed to overtake you at every turn? You were thriving, you were flourishing, you were prosperous and secure—but then things began to fall apart.  Samuel leaves Saul and heads to Gilgal.  The Bible never even mentions his input into the current attack and war Saul was facing. I cannot even begin to imagine the despondency.  It’s one thing for a man to forsake you—but can you fathom God withdrawing His precious Spirit and presence from you?! I sure cannot.

Those who have tasted the grace and glory of God know O’ too well what a terrifying glimpse of life without that grace might look like. And like King David, we all shudder and cling to the dust–on our faces, earnestly groaning—Do not cast me from your presence or take your Holy Spirit from me (Psalm 51:11).

With the aid of God, we are still at best dependent and unfit for His service.  So without His aid, we are undone, we are unblessed, and we have no chance to stand against the evil that seeks to hound and overwhelm us on every side.

Glory is seldom abruptly stripped from a life, family or nation.  It is usually a slow fade.  To lose sight of the greatness of our sin and wretchedness, the brutality and price of Calvary—the precious blood God shed for our own redemption and the magnitude of the debt of gratitude we owe to a gracious God for such a redemption–is to lose at every front.

Let us examine our ways o’ glorious ones!  If you have known peace, joy, hope, and a blessed flourishing life—then let us keep in step with the Spirit of God who has so richly blessed each one of us, lest our glory fade and we come to know our unblessed nakedness without the Spirit of the LIVING GOD!

That is why Israel is unable to stand against her enemies; they turn their backs and run because they have been made liable to destruction. I will not be with you anymore unless you destroy whatever among you is devoted to destruction (Joshua 7:12)

cropped-marlene-maina-signature-black-and-white-jji.png Marlene Maina | 9.8.17

Family, Legacy, Prayer, Wisdom

Samuel: A Rare Clarity

To hear HIM wellThe Desire to Hear HIM Well

As I journey through first Samuel once more, a deep longing of desire overwhelmed me when I came to chapter nine.  Not only did I enjoy the story, it felt new! I was pulled in by the intimate detailed conversations between Saul and Samuel and their first meeting and introductory days near Mizpah. Was this story always this beautiful? The new beginnings for Saul, Samuel and a persistent Israel are quite captivating. Saul, who knew little to nothing about Samuel is unknowingly led by God (with the help of a servant) right to the proverbial doorsteps of a well-informed prophet who God had prepared in detail to anticipate his arrival.

The Bible tells us, Samuel was now old.  His sons (Joel & Abijah) who Samuel had appointed to lead Israel were reported to have turned aside after dishonest gain, accepting bribes and perverting justice—reminding us much of the sons of Eli, the high priest who tiny little Samuel had replaced. Which meant the old man Samuel had to continue in his role as prophet and judge over Israel until the LORD could find someone of the same spirit.

The backdrop of this scene is of course not good.  God’s heart is broken.  His people have rejected Him and asked for a king.  Samuel is grieved, but God insists he should listen to the people and do as they have asked.  It is in the midst of this grief where God permissively grants Israel’s request that something beautiful emerged out of the chapter for me personally—deeply endearing my heart to the God of Israel.

For one, He (God) cautions the people of what having a king might mean for their properties and their sons and daughters. When they insist to go forward, He does not begrudge them or treat them with resentment—even though he would be completely justified to withdraw His participation and presence from the entire thing. Instead, God remains loving and engaged.  He even guides Samuel through a VERY detailed process telling him that He would be guiding a young man to him the next day and what Samuel is to say to him.

Can I please point out that God’s character is SO deeply endearing to me?! He is impressive, above reproach and simply amazing!  He had judged the house of Eli and raised up Samuel.  He could dwell on the sin of the sons of Samuel or the collective stubbornness of the hearts of the house of Israel, or He could simply walk out of this and let Israel figure it out—but He doesn’t. Instead, He simply moves forward with the vessel that is willing, faithful and yielded to Him not being hindered by Samuel’s age, the people’s rejection of Him, or the omniscience He holds to know what Israel’s future was going to look like in just a few short years. He talks to Samuel, he asks him to anoint Saul with oil. Read the details.  Samuel is able to give Saul blow-by-blow details of what his journey back home would look like.  God even fills him with the Holy Spirit and literally–changes the man to equip him for the job, signifying that He dearly cares for His people even when we are walking outside of His ways. What a heart! This is beautiful; totally worth emulating!

I gleaned quite a few practical lessons from this passage today, but the deepest longing it awakened in my soul that brought me to my knees before heaven was the intimacy God shared with Samuel. Samuel did not have to guess or wonder what God was saying—he heard God clearly and consistently.  The instructions Samuel gave Saul were accurate and reliable.  They were the VERY words of God!  “You stay here for a little while” he had told Saul “so that I may give you a message from God”.  These words would make any 21st-century Christian cringe (because of how misused they have been), yet this was how Samuel had led Israel, and he would be the very same channel God would use to visit Jesse—regarding God’s own choice for King (David).  So I got on my knees this morning and I prayed earnestly “Lord, I desire to hear you exceptionally well.” Lead me, guide me, and grant me such intimate clear lines of communication with you, that I too like Samuel (in spite the wrong or evil that was going on with his family or his nation) will be able to hear you my LORD with a rare clarity—and speak reliable words that will lead your people to honor your great name.

 Marlene Maina  // 9.1.17